November 9, 2014

Olympic recurve archery

This month marks a year since I’ve started doing Olympic recurve archery. What a treat it’s been!

There is a lot to write about archery from equipment to mindset. I will post in the future about some of the things I’ve learned along the way. For now I just want to give a heads up to Ron Jackson and the Ontario Centre for Classical Sports.

Ron is a former fencer and current archer who started the OCCS in Mississauga (3750 B unit 14 Laird Road, Mississauga). It is in an industrial park that is newly renovated with a large, fresh and modern look. He has about 24 lanes for archers of all skill levels in a very friendly and inviting atmosphere. Everyone who works there is great to deal with. I usually go at about 3 or 4 pm on a Saturday and there are usually only a couple other archers there with, perhaps, a class going on in a curtained off section. There is no crowding and no rivalry.

Oh, and they teach fencing as well!

It is sad that a city the size of Toronto really doesn’t have many archery venues. Shawn Adams runs a location near Danforth and Chester but there is a waiting list. Hart House at the University of Toronto has an archery range in place of the old gun range in the 2nd subterranean floor. It’s has room for about 8 archers, is crowded and hot. The people there are also pleasant but getting on the list is very difficult.

At the OCCS you can buy a 5 hour pass for $55 to be used any time they have open shooting. Ron also gives lessons and he is an excellent teacher (as are others on staff). He also runs a Pro Shop where I have bought all my equipment at very competitive prices. He custom twined my string and custom assembled arrows. Ron never seems rushed or patronizing although I have often asked really dumb questions.

As I said on opening, I will add to this post in the coming weeks. For me personally, the equipment has been a major part of the discovery of archery. From bicycles to bows, from baseball gloves to skates, I have always loved the technical aspect of any sport I’ve taken part of. I will delve into that. Stay tuned.

November 9, 2014

Bateman Bicycle Company–913 Bathurst St

Some a**hole bent the rear wheel of my single speed a couple of weeks ago. While in general I am not a supporter of the death penalty I have pondered it’s appropriateness for bike vandals. After discussion with my son I have decided that perhaps the death penalty is not apt (although deserving). Instead I have decided that public flogging is the way to go.

However, that is not the purpose of this posting. Although if you support flogging let me know. I’m thinking of fundraising for a flogging post to be established somewhere in the city…

So I went to my local bike shop, Bateman’s on Bathurst St about 2 1/2 blocks north of Bloor to see if the rim was fixable. Alas, it was too bent out of shape (much like my mood) to be repaired.

So we had to order a new rim and have a wheel built. I wanted the same 28 rim with 30 spoke wheel that I had …an Alex 28…and I wanted to re-use my Formula hub (and freewheel). I told them that my single speed was my life (my Pinarello road bike if pure pleasure but is not my daily commuter) and I hoped they could get this done soon as i didn’t know how I would exist without it.

Within minutes they flipped over my Michelin Lithium rubber and freewheel onto a loaner wheel, returned my bike to me and said they would let me know when the new wheel was built. The next week they called me to say that they couldn’t get the same rim and offered to get me a better rim for an extra $25…after about a one second pause I said yes, I think I can suffer through a better built wheel.

Next week I dropped in on a Friday at about 5:30 pm and they flipped back my tire and freewheel onto the newly built wheel and I was ready to leave in minutes.

The cost? $70 for the rim and $50 for the wheel build plus tax. No other charges and I was never without a rideable wheel the whole time.

That’s great service for a local bike shop. Other nearby shops won’t even fix a flat for drop ins and here I had my bike back on the road in no time. I was never without a ride. And, I should add, all this was done with smiles and the most friendly of attitudes.

That’s a huge thumbs up for Bateman Bicycles.

By the way, they also have a new spin class program at their ‘warehouse’ location a block away at Bathurst and Barton for reasonable rates. And if you have a friend coming to town they do bike rentals from hybrids to high class road bikes.

Their retail prices are full retail. You can get cheaper elsewhere. But a bike shop is a service business. And on the service side I’ve never done better than here.

October 25, 2014

Ybia Anderson: why I’m supporting her for school Trustee

A creative, responsible, fresh face for Toronto District School Board in Trinity-Spadina.

Voting for Toronto District School Board trustee is a much overlooked but huge responsibility. Our future really does depend on public schools more than most other social services.

Most importantly, in my mind, public schools represent the most social levelling and integrative institution we have. Anyone who has looked at the TDSB can only wince at the dysfunctional cabal that it is (yes, worse than City Hall). I say cabal because if you read articles both in today’s Toronto Star and the Globe and Mail you can smell the whiff of corruption.

Even those so-called ‘progressives’ we elected are acting in the most undemocratic fashion. They treat the TDSB as if it belongs to them instead of to all of us.

We desperately need new progressive faces.

Two days ago I had the opportunity to meet with one of the candidates running for Trustee in Trinity-Spadina, Ybia Anderson.

Here is why I like her. She is young (at 32) but not, like the leading candidate, a 20-something with no life experience beyond politics. She is a single mom with a young child. She actually holds down a real job at a major company where she has to look after financial issues. She can juggle numbers and believes accountability is important. I mean she truly believes this. I know all candidates are saying this but I know at least one of them who has a track record of just the opposite.

She also believes that economic disparities are important. Where Michael Sims, a progressive candidate for Trustee, says that the dome proposal to privatize the field at Central Tech is THE issue of the district, Ybia would feel that children in lower income areas showing up hungry to school is more important (I should note that she also opposes the dome).

She has creative ideas about new approaches to not just fiscal responsibility but to management at the TDSB. Would a green roof on top of Central Tech provide an interesting project for students and perhaps food for a breakfast program at Ryerson Public School?

I think Ybia is bright, thoughtful and creative. And I think she is the true deal.

I worry that the front runner comes from the old school of knee jerk politicians that promise change but bring more of the same.

June 2, 2014

Do you still want to vote NDP?

The polls in Ontario are showing the Conservatives getting stronger. Hudak is approaching majority territory. It will be a very close election. So, if you are a progressive voter, what do you want to do with your vote?

You can give it to a member of the NDP but that will involve forgetting that when the Liberals raised the minimum wage Horwath sat on her hands. When the Liberals talked about expanding public transit Horwath said not if it meant taxing ‘the middle class’. When the Liberals brought down their budget Horwarth was seen standing outside with her moistened finger in the air.

It was revealed today in the Globe and Mail (Jun 2, 2014) that Hudak has been down to the U.S. consulting with leading right wing Replicans and members of the Tea Party group. He’s the same guy whose plan for 1,000,000 new jobs has just been demonstrated to be an arithmetical fantasy. But, as the Conservative spokesperson replied on CBC: ‘do you want to listen to a bunch of egghead economists or listen to what you know is right’.

That’s an interesting response because Andrea Horwath is now pushing the ‘common sense’ line in her TV ads.

One only has to remember what happened the last time the NDP felt they could pick up seats in an election to defeat the Liberals. That was when they brought down Paul Martin. And in one fell swoop we lost the Kelowna Accord (and who is now paying the huge price for that?) and a National Day Care program. Not to mention the enjoyable last eight years of Steven Harper’s government. Nope, not only is a vote for the NDP a vote to the right of the Liberals in this election but a vote for the NDP may indeed be a vote for Hudak. When all the seats are counted, the Lieutenant Governor will approach whichever party has the most seats in the Legislature to form a government.

That better be the Liberals. According to the polls it cannot be the NDP. And it better not be the PCs.

If you live in a riding where only the NDP could beat the Conservatives, please vote NDP. But if you live in a riding where a Liberal could beat an NDP (like my riding of Trinity Spadina) I am voting Liberal so that at the end of the day there can be one more Liberal standing than Conservatives.

Sorry NDP, you blew it.

June 2, 2014

Do you really want to vote NDP?

The polls are showing the Conservatives getting stronger. Hudak is approaching majority territory. It will be a very close election.

So, if you are a progressive voter, what do you want to do with your vote?

You can give it to a member of the NDP but that will involve forgetting that when the Liberals raised the minimum wage Horwath sat on her hands.

When the Liberals talked about expanding public transit Horwath said not if it meant taxing ‘the middle class’.

When the Liberals brought down their budget Horwarth was seen standing outside with her moistened finger in the air.

It was revealed today in the Globe and Mail (Jun 2, 2014) that Hudak has been down to the U.S. consulting with leading right wing Replicans and members of the Tea Party group. He’s the same guy whose plan for 1,000,000 new jobs has just been demonstrated to be an arithmetical fantasy. But, as the Conservative spokesperson replied on CBC: ‘do you want to listen to a bunch of egghead economists or listen to what you know is right’.

That’s an interesting response because Andrea Horwath is now pushing the ‘common sense’ line in her TV ads.

One only has to remember what happened the last time the NDP felt they could pick up seats in an election to defeat the Liberals. That was when they brought down Paul Martin. And in one fell swoop we lost the Kelown Accord (and who is now paying the huge price for that?) and a National Day Care program. Not to mention the enjoyable last weight years of Steven Harper’s government.

Nope, not only is a vote for the NDP a vote to the right of the Liberals in this election but a vote for the NDP may indeed be a vote for Hudak. When all the seats are counted, the Lieutenant Governor will approach whichever party has the most seats in the Legistlature

May 24, 2014

Tacking to the centre or losing our way?

I have written twice now about the Ontario election. Today there is a public letter out from a number of NDP stalwarts bemoaning the move to the centre of the Ontario NDP. It reminds me very much of all the years I put into the NDP when I was younger.

Perhaps I am becoming more conservative with time. That’s always a possibility, as scary a concept as it seems to me. But I wonder about the value of ideological purity in the absence of access to power. The NDP has always struggled to reconcile the contradictions between seeing itself as a movement or a political party seeking to attain power.

Many in the party, and I suspect that includes most of those who signed the letter and many labour leaders, enjoy the self satisfaction of the concept of purity. They enjoy the self righteousness that the Left likes to feel about itself and are seriously disturbed when they have to relinquish some of that in order to persuade others to come along for the ride. The object of a political party (and, I would think, of any political movement) is to convince others that they have the correct approach that will eventually lead to solutions of problems and a better life outcome. This often means compromise and dialogue. That is hard for many people. And the Left finds it very hard.

I don’t object to some tracking to the centre. New Labour in Britain may never have attained power without a move to the centre. One may reasonably ask then what is the purpose of attaining power if only to be the same as everyone else? That’s a fair question and one that can reasonably be asked of Andrea Horwath and the Ontario NDP. Considering they don’t have a response to the Liberals’ pension plan, they are week on public transit (particularly how to pay for it) and took forever to respond to the Liberals’ raising of the minimum wage, why then vote for them?

And that’s the question I would ask today.

It’s not the ‘tacking to the centre’ that the NDP have undertaken that I object to. It’s the complete absence of vision that concerns me. The NDP have borrowed from the federal Conservatives the concept of ‘retail politics’. They are offering individual tidbits to parts of the electorate in an attempt to buy their votes. The is not social democratic territory in any realm.

As I said in a previous article, the Right has gone a long way to convince the public that there is no good role for government, smaller is better. The Ontario Liberals with their transit, but particularly the pension plan, are saying that there IS a role for government. And to me that is a huge statement and a huge ideological platform that I strongly support.

One last thing. I chuckled when I read that some traditional NDPers object to Horwath saying she would try to stop waste in government. Of course the phrase ‘cutting government waste’ is often code for cutting services. But I think Tommy Douglas would be turning in his grave if he thought that the NDP would not be fiscally prudent and hard on mismanagement and waste. Any prairie socialist understood that taxpayer money was a trust. Too bad today’s socialists seem to have such little regard for thrift.

May 23, 2014

Say no to Hudak

I continue to watch the polls like a hawk.

The Conservatives continue to lead. The polls seem to show that the Liberals could still get more seats with a lower percentage of the popular vote because of their vote distribution. Yet it is disturbing that the Conservatives are still ahead.

The polls are a bit volatile, however.

It appears that the Conservative vote is more likely to hold than the Libs or NDP with voters moving between the latter two in preference. That would suggest that the biggest battle at this point is among the more ‘progressive’ voters. Conservatives know what they want, the rest of us are unsure. And that’s where strategic voting is so important.

At the moment the NDP have no chance of forming a government. They know that. They are hoping that disgust with the Liberals (and fear of the Conservatives) will move voters enough in their direction that they have a significant jump in seats after this election. That would position them, they feel, for a legitimate run in the next election. They could care less if this strategy puts in power an extreme right wing government in Hudak.

This is the same strategy used by Layton to dump Martin. To some extent it seemed to have worked. Their seat total propelled them into Official Opposition. The fact that it has given us 8 years of Stephen Harper seems not to matter to NDPers.

If the Liberals are resurgent in the next federal elution and the NDP goes back to 3rd party status all their machinations will have failed. This currently looks like a real possibility. They will have had a temporary blip in popularity at the price of a country-wrenching Harper government.

And this is what we may see in Ontario. The NDP will hand the reigns of power to the Conservatives while realizing some temporary gains in seats.

Having had a look at the NDP platform just released can anyone really say it is worth the gamble so the NDP can gain seats?

I know Liberals are not to be trusted. I know their ‘progressive’ attitudes can be fleeting. But Horwath is hardly the clear headed and decisive leader to move this province forward. She took weeks at each of the last two budgets, while standing outside with her finger in the air, before deciding whether she could support the Liberals. She is an opportunist.

I’m not looking for an ideologue. I can live with the NDP deciding a move to the middle is where they want to be. But they haven’t moved to the middle so much as the muddle.

I’m voting strategically. And I’m voting Liberal. That is, unless a shock happens and the polls show the NDP passing the Liberals in likely seats. Then I will vote NDP.

As I’ve said before: when the votes are counted and the Lieutenant Governor approaches a party leader to form the next government, I want that person to be anyone but Hudak.

May 17, 2014

Election Ontario

I’ve been wrestling with how to vote for a while now. Ever since St Jack screwed Canada so royally.

We had a negotiated national child care program, a Kelowna Accord. We lost both of those so Layton and the NDP could stroke their egos by denouncing their true enemy. No, no the Conservatives, but the Liberals.

I’ve been involved in politics for a lot of years. I began formally working for the NDP as a teen. I learned early on that the real enemy was those fickle Liberals. As Smokey Thomas pronounced at the start of this election campaign ‘at least we know what the Conservatives stand for’.

Well, yes we do. They stand for a lot of regressive and nasty things. Just the way Stephen Harper is no Brian Mulroney or Joe Clark, Hudak is no Bill Davis.

Now I have to admit, when I was younger I thought all Conservatives were the same. And, to be sure, I still don’t like them in most any guise. But Harper and Hudak aren’t your patents’ Progressive Conservatives. They are a new breed, a spin off of the American Republican right. Yes, we’ve seen these kind of people before in Canada. But until recently there has always been a tempering dose of Red Tory-ism in the party. Not this iteration.

So when the NDP hands the reigns of power to the likes of Stephen Harper because of some crass internal political calculation we have to take notice.

And if Andrea Horvath, in her new role as a small ‘c’ conservative populist, hands the election to Hudak’s Conservatives, then the NDP will have cemented their role as obstructionists to the progressive agenda.

I like my local NDP MPP. But when the ballots are counted and we are presumably left with a minority government (oh my god, not a Conservative majority) I want the Liberals to have one more seat than the Conservatives. Even if that means one fewer NDP sear. I want the Lieutenant Governor to ask the Liberals to form a government, not the Conservatives.

Under Wynn the Liberals are campaigning to the left of the NDP. I know, the NDP rhetoric is that you cannot trust the Liberals to carry out their program. They have a history of running from the left and ruling to the right. I am not naive. But what I like about the Liberal campaign is their pension plan policy and their transit policy. Unlike the NDP’s policy of handing nibbles to the ‘middle class’ the Liberals are not afraid to offer vision and a bold role for the public sector. I feel the Liberals are saying ‘government is back’. I think in these times of less taxes and smaller government that’s a hugely important message.

That’s why, for the first time in my life, I’m going to vote Liberal. I want to break away from the strangle hold I feel the NDP has had on my vote and give it to a progressive party. This time around that appears to be the Liberal Party.

May 6, 2014

“Farmers feed cities”

I’m sure everyone has seen this bumper sticker at least once. It seems to be growing in popularity.

I guess farmers are feeling neglected.

Now I have nothing against farmers. We need food so we need farmers. But I find the whining and winging a bit annoying.

If it weren’t for urban population concentrations where would farmers sell their goods? If it weren’t for manufacturing and the urban working class how would farmers plant and harvest their produce? If it weren’t for scientists at universities how would farmers get those new hardier and more economically/environmentally viable strains of grain and other plants?

What I resent, as a progressive urban dweller, is the conservative governments that farmers continue to disproportionally support. Rural voters (not all farmers, of course) stymie the progressive instincts of the urban population. They vote for governments that would decrease the earning power of the people who buy from farmers and produce their machinery. They vote for governments that deny climate change and would cut back of agricultural scientific research.

So every time I see one of these bumpers stickers I feel like asking the driver ‘what the f**k are you asking for?’.

Read this article for some of the economics of farming in Canada: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/taxpayers-oblivious-to-the-cost-of-farm-subsidies/article13055078/

I think it’s better to practice the politics of inclusion and unity of working people…whether in the city or on the farm, not sow division the way these silly bumper stickers do.

November 5, 2013

An open letter to the supporters of Rob Ford

Truly, I’m trying to understand.

I know Ford’s schtick is that he’s for ‘the little guy’. I can see why that idea is attractive. Most Torontonians are little guys and, of late, the bureaucracy has been more evasive…more distant.
Many officials treat the public with disdain. The economic recession has left a greater gap between haves and have-nots. There is much to be pissed off about.

But how is Rob Ford a reasonable response to this unease and sense of distance from our government?

Let’s just look at some facts. Many of the people I see interviewed on T.V. Who speak in support of Ford look like people who are self made and worked hard. But what about Rob Ford?

He grew up in a rich family. His father was a wealthy business man. HE may have been self made. Rob? He grew up rich. Did he use that privilege to go out and make something of his own?

No. He went into Daddy’s business … with his brother Doug, also a non self starter.
Their father was an MPP in Mike Harris’ government. Hardly an outsider by anyone’s definition.
So from where does this ‘outsider’ status accrue to Rob Ford? He’s been a politician for years. His Dad was one. He grew up rich and he lives rich. How many of you are riding around in a Cadillac?

Ok, then, but his policies are for ‘the little guy’.
Who uses public transit more: the rich or the poor and working class? Rob Ford has supported every policy in favour of cars over transit. In fact, his cancelling of Transit City when he came to office cost far more ($82,000,000) than any savings he has found on the gravy tran.
He supported cutbacks for the Toronto Public Library system and doesn’t support spending on community clubs in ‘at risk ‘ neighbourhoods. He doesn’t support public housing either.
So just who are the ‘little guys’ then?

When his private company held a party he called the City and asked it to pave the street in front of his building. They did.
When his football team needed a bus he called the Chair of the TTC … directly. The bus arrived.

Can you or I do that?
Is that the actions of the little guy or the privileged? You tell me.

So what about Rob Ford draws you to him?
He comes from the upper class and lives the lifestyle (out of the camera’s glare) and certainly behaves as if he is entitled.

Now, if you are just right wing and, on principle, believe that there is little or no role for government and that taxes are simply theft on your private wealth then I can see that you’ve found your man.
And I know that some working class people, in addition to many of the wealthy, have this point of view. I disagree with it but that’s democracy.

But for the majority of you for whom Rob Ford’s policies are destructive … I just don’t get it.

And this talk of ‘the elites’ out to get Ford. Well I have already covered this. How many of you can get the Prime Minister out to a barbeque, along with the Minister of Finance? That’s an outsider? C’mon, wake up folks!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: